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Q&A: Rosemont College’s New President, Jayson Boyers

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Photo Courtesy of Rosemont College.

Dedicating his career to higher education, Jayson Boyers will embark on his latest endeavor as the 14th president of Rosemont College, taking office on June 1. Boyers previously held roles at Vermont’s Champlain College and, most recently, as president of Cleary University in Michigan. We spoke to him about his goals during this tumultuous time for small liberal arts colleges.

MLT: Why higher education?

JB: I started out in youth ministry. Education is something I got into because I really wanted to have an impact in my career. I am a first-generation college graduate, and so is my wife, Mandy. For us, it’s made all the difference in the world, and it all goes back to our education.

MLT: What brought you to Rosemont College?

JB: Rosemont has committed to a good portion of their population being first-generation [college graduates], and it drew me in. For the longest time I have wanted to lead a Catholic institution. My master’s and doctorate were both done at Catholic institutions.

MLT: Are there similarities between Rosemont and Cleary?

JB: Both Cleary and Rosemont are about the same size. I see the difference that can be made in the lives of our students, so I think those similarities exist, as well.

MLT: What about the current challenges in higher education?

JB: I see them as opportunities to really sharpen the iron and learn who we are and where we best can make an impact based on our mission.

I really believe that most schools have a desire to develop people who become good citizens, not just people who get jobs. Their graduates go out and help build their communities and contribute to society.

MLT: When it comes to living in this area, what are you most looking forward to?

JB: My wife is a dragon boater, and she’s already joined a team in the area. Philadelphia is a great food town we’re kind of foodies.

MLT: What are your goals at Rosemont?

JB: I’m looking forward to starting what I like to call  “the great conversation,” where I talk with people about what Rosemont College means to them, what it has meant, and what it means going forward. Rosemont will be launching a new strategic plan, and I also have a chance to be a part of that conversation.